Autofix FAQ

For some of the problems that we detect on your system, we offer an Autofix link that can automatically correct the problem. This FAQ explains how to use an Autofix, and what to do if it doesn’t seem to work.

Note: We test each AutoFix to ensure that it works properly, but system configurations vary and it is possible that a repair will not work on your system. If you have problems or questions not covered by the information here, look or ask on our forums for help. You should always keep proper backups to avoid data loss in case of a hardware or software problem.

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What is an AutoFix?

An Autofix is a small program that runs on your system to adjust system settings. AutoFixes eliminate the need to manually edit the registry, use Notepad to edit configuration files, or dig through Windows dialog boxes to find and fix problems. Windows Scripting Host (WSH) is the basic technology that PC Pitstop uses to build AutoFixes.

How do I use an AutoFix?

You can use an AutoFix in two different ways. The easiest is to run it directly from your browser. Another way is to save the AutoFix file to the disk on your own PC and run it from there. Each method is described below. We suggest you print this page for reference. You can use the link at the bottom of the page to see a printer friendly version of this page.

Run from the browser

  1. On the page giving you diagnostic advice, click the AutoFix link. That will take you to the AutoFix Repairs page.
  2. Click the “Left-click here” link with the left mouse button.
  3. The browser will display a dialog for downloading the file. Select “Run this file” or “Open this file” and click OK. (If you don’t get a dialog, see the Troubleshooting section below.)
  4. The AutoFix program will run and ask if you want to apply the repair. It may also display information about the work it is about to do. If everything looks okay, click Yes.
  5. When the AutoFix is complete, the program will show you a dialog indicating it has made the repair. Click OK.
  6. That’s it! The AutoFix has been applied and you’re good to go. Rerun the tests to see updated results.

Save to disk and run locally

  1. On the page giving you diagnostic advice, click the AutoFix link. That will take you to the AutoFix Repairs page.
  2. Click the “Right click here” link with the right mouse button.
  3. Select “Save target as” (IE) or “Save link as” (Netscape).
  4. Save the file somewhere you can easily find it, like your desktop.
  5. Now, locate and double-click the file you saved in the previous step.
  6. The AutoFix program will run and ask if you want to apply the repair. It may also display information about the work it is about to do. If everything looks okay, click Yes.
  7. When the AutoFix is complete, the program will show you a dialog indicating it has made the repair. Click OK.
  8. That’s it! The AutoFix has been applied and you’re good to go. Rerun the tests to see updated results.

Where can I find a list of Autofixes?

You can see all the AutoFixes by visiting the AutoFix Repair Bay, but we usually recommend that you run them only when advised by a tip in your test results. “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it…” words to live by.

How can I find out which Autofixes I have used?

Whenever you have tested as a registered user, we remember the information about which Autofixes you have downloaded for each system you test. You can see this list in the Details part of your test results, available from the Summary page. Note that this information won’t necessarily be saved for anonymous users, since anonymous results are saved in the database only for a short time. Also, we can only associate the results with a computer if you run the Autofix while viewing test results for that computer.

Can Autofixes be undone?

Some, but not all Autofixes can be undone. For example, the Internet Cache Cleanup Autofix cannot be reversed, because its purpose is to delete files to free up disk space. Autofixes that provide the ability to undo themselves will show that option as part of their user interface if you run them a second time. For example, the Internet Speed Autofix can reset your receive buffer to its default setting.

How do I uninstall an Autofix?

If you run the Autofix directly from the site, the file is in your cache and will automatically be removed when you clear your IE cache. If you saved the file to your local disk, just delete the file. The Autofix does not install any software on your system.

Why won’t the Autofix run on my system?

If you are getting an error message when the Autofix tries to run, these are the most common reasons:

  • Antivirus software may be blocking the AutoFix, thinking it is a virus. If your antivirus software shows an alert when you run the AutoFix, it is probably
  • A browser utility may be corrupting the AutoFix by modifying the text of the file. Ad-blocking utilities such as AdSubtract (also included in ZoneAlarm) can modify the code of the Autofix, preventing it from running properly.
  • Your scripting may need to be updated if you are running Windows 95 or 98. See the item below for information on the scripting update.

The troubleshooting page may provide some other information about what could be causing the problem.

Why does Dreamweaver/Notepad open an AutoFix?

Some program has changed the file association for .js or .hta files. To fix this problem, Start Explorer (My Computer) and select Tools | Folder Options, File Types tab. Find the type “JScript file” and have it open with “Windows Script Host”. If “Windows Script Host” isn’t listed, click the Browse button and find the file c:WindowsSystemwscript.exe (Win 98/Me) or c:WindowsSystem32wscript.exe (Win 2000/XP).

Why do I get a warning the Autofix is a virus or malicious?

Scripts are often used by viruses and sent in email messages. Because of that, some virus software will always warn you when you try to run scripts, regardless of whether they are viruses or not.

Where do I get the Windows Scripting Update?

You may need to update your Windows Scripting Host software if you are running Windows 95, 98, or NT. Download it here and run the downloaded file to update your scripting.

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