BTjunkie Shuts Down Voluntarily After FBI Raid

February 08, 2012 by in The Pit Blog

One of the worlds TOP5 torrent sites, BTjunkie has voluntarily shut down.

The torrent powerhouse hosted over 4 million active files but had never been the target of  US Federal action. Reacting to the recent demise of MegaUpload and less recently The Pirate Bay, BTJ admins are waving the white flag. It appears that a future filled with attorneys, arrests, seizures, and fines, didn’t seem much fun.

Recent FBI raids have flashed a bleak future for Torrent Sites.   In January, US federal action resulted in  arrests without bail for MegaUpload  big shots including founder, Kim Dotcom.

which describes itself as The place where breaking news, Bit Torrent and copyright collide, reports that at least 2 other sites in the Top10 have considered the same action.

This change in attitude by torrent owners is because they are now GLOBAL TARGETS. Consider this, MegaUploads owners were German citizens living in New Zealand and yet they were easily arrested by US authorities.  Torrent owners have been put on notice and are vulnerable regardless of local laws.

Headlines like, Is BitTorrent Done? make for some great reading, straight from those who are deeply involved with Torrent news, but I doubt that torrents are dead…yet.

 

Are Torrents Dead?

The very technology which caused this cops and robbers game is going to be the very thing that keeps torrents going. You can’t stop progress. The Internet is not going away.

Torrent owners like Gary Fung from isoHunt.com and Extratorrent’s admin SaM are fighting to continue file sharing.

Fung has been fighting civil lawsuits for 6 years, “What happened with MegaUpload is not at all good for the torrent world, but I would say it is impossible to stop the unstoppable. After all, if one site is shut down, a hundred new sites will open,” Sam said in an interview with industry observers, “We have no plans to shut down,we will continue running as usual.”

What do Torrent Users Say?

As you would expect you get the normal posts of “That Sucks”, “Thanks for the Memories”, etc, etc. but the overall feeling is one of BUSINESS AS USUAL. Users know it’s just a matter of time before someone takes the place of BTJ, ET, and TPB. They also know that new technology will be the key to Free movie, music, and file downloads in the future. There are always going to be people who go to a movie as an event and there are always going to be those people who refuse to pay for a movie. Who knows, maybe we will all be paying a US Entertainment Tax in the future.

Do you use torrents to acquire copyright protected, movies, protected software?

Tell me your thoughts, no FED’s here.

____________________________________________________________

BTjunkie closes

The Pirate Bay Shut Down

Kim Dotcom

Dotcom AWOL

Torrent Forum

10 Responses to BTjunkie Shuts Down Voluntarily After FBI Raid

  1. Jonny Vee says:

    I just downloaded a utility from ThePirateBay LAST NIGHT! It is FAR from shut down. Get your facts straight! Plus, I agree with Andy, down there: I was one of those guys who used to make tapes of albums, I would make my own compilation tapes. The MPAA and RIAA do NOT want us to do that: They tried to stop Cassettes from being developed, they tried to stop VHS and Betamax. They tried to stop Burnable CD Roms, they tried to stop DVDs and now Blu-Ray. I am NOT worried about this "raid" – all of the services I use to get my pirated moovies programs and other junk reside out of country, and can't be touched: And basically, these countries are so tired of the MPAA and the US trying to dictate their laws to them, that they have begun to tell the MPAa to get stuffed! For every ONE Public site the FBI shuts down, about 20 NEW PRIVATE site pop up, and the only way the MPAA has now to stop us is to try to bully our Service providers to CHARGE for high-bandwidth. I still use Because and I have a whole lot of bandwidth I can use each month. The real, underlying issue is: People actually go out and BUY things if they think it is worthwhile. MPAA wants us not to have that option, they want us to pay 50 bucks for a moovie. I will NOT pay that price for a movie I have not seen, but I WILL download it and watch it, if I like it, THEN I'll buy it. And I do BUY a lot of DVDs and Blu Ray!


  2. Marpleshopper says:

    Remember the old 70’s/80’s record company refrain ‘Home Taping Is Killing Music’, well it didn’t then and filesharing won’t kill it now. There was plenty of good music around then, as there still is now. It was usually the people who bought the most records who did the most taping, because they were real fans of the music. They couldn’t have spent any more on records had they wanted to, as they were spending to the limit of their ability on the things already. The industry of course wouldn’t accept this. It knew best!

    What has killed some music is record company and artist greed. There should be nothing against people being well rewarded for excellent work, but just ‘cause you’ve written a bunch of good songs and recorded them well enough that millions of people like them, shouldn’t mean that you, your manager, and the record company get to make squillions of pounds/dollars/whatever, and keep making them until the year dot. But over the last 35 years that is what it has come to mean, and of course they don’t want it to stop. In fact as with all things corporate they want more and bigger profits year on year on year.

    Record companies always say they need the money to develop new talent, and market the records. Rubbish! If the music’s good, it’ll get picked up (especially nowadays with YouTube et al) and sell loads anyway. And if they need to keep spending loads of money ramming it down everyone’s throats so people but it, well that’s their choice.

    As Sting once said, at the Brit Awards I seem to remember, when asked for advice to pass on to aspiring performers, ‘Let your music be its own reward’. Doesn’t seem to have done him any harm financially!


  3. file sharing… hmmm… while I am not a big user of the sites I have used them infrequently to replace lost/obsolete software and see no harm in them other than the risk of infected files. is it here to stay? of course it is. rather than spending so much trying to shut these sites down that money can be better spent making more jobs, giving people on fixed incomes more cost of living raises, etc.


  4. It's not hard to believe. I agree with Andy Bonanno. My favorite and it is absolutly free is MP3 rocket which is far more superior than any P2P file share program that there is and ever will be, also the fastest. It's free. suppose it won't be long before they shut it down like Limewire which can't even come close.


  5. JaneMarauder says:

    If the government regulated how to walk your dog you’d have to drag it by the tail. ~ Me.


  6. LarryF says:

    I use bittorrent to get programming that is not available in the US, and try to avoid content that is copyrighted here.

    Still, I am disgusted and dismayed that the music, TV, and movie industries are spending so much money and effort to buy congressional votes to make normal citizens of the USA into criminals. SOPA and PIPA are classic examples of this. I believe that any congressman or senator who speaks or votes in favor of such things should be recalled to remind the others that the guys with big bank accounts aren’t the only people in this country who can affect their careers.


  7. Andy Bonanno says:

    Remember when we used to tape our favorite songs right off the radio? Remember how we'd make our own mix tapes and give copies to our friends because they liked the mix? Remember recording your favorite movies off the TV on your VCR? Are we all criminals? When we play our favorite CD at a party, only one person paid for the disc. Is the person who owns the CD a criminal for sharing it or the people who listened without buying it?

    All these arrests aren't going to stop people from sharing videos and music. They tried selling movies on DIVX discs that you could only play 3 times. Those didn't last long. Sharing is here to stay.


  8. Somebody says:

    I don’t use P2P software to download copyrighted material. As I live in another country, I use one P2P program to send family home videos. Before we used to send DVDs but sometimes these got damaged in the post or never arrived. Nowadays,I just leave them in a file on the computer which this program has access to. I encrypt and password the videos or files, give them an alphanumerical name and send this to the family members. A password is sent via another method to unlock the files. They download via this P2P program and send me an email back to say they have downloaded it. I do the same with them. I can see a video of my cousin in another country within a few hours of them putting it on their computer.


  9. Corpsecrank says:

    Look lets not act as if it was so easy for the US to step in and arrest the megaupload staff. The truth and bottom line is that they rented servers IN THE US and that is the ONLY reason the US had any way to step in and nab them at all.

    That does not apply to any other site that hosts illegal files so long as they keep the servers in a location that does not go after them for CRI.


  10. Iman Oldgeek says:

    I want to know how the hell US authorities have any power on foreign soil against people not even native to that country. Seems like our government is so fond of big media funding that overstepping little things like constitutional boundaries and national sovereignty means nothing to them.


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